877-775-3274
 

News

Identity protection

Social butterflies with smartphones must watch out for identity theft

Social butterflies with smartphones must watch out for identity theft

10/11/2013

When you think about the time you spend using your smartphone every day, what does it actually look like? Chances are, you're not gabbing with your friends, relatives and co-workers anymore. Instead, you might be playing games, watching YouTube videos and checking in on frenemies on Facebook. The way we all use our mobile devices is changing rapidly, and while that can be a good thing in some ways (it's fun, for one), it might also put us at risk of experiencing some serious catastrophes, including identity theft. 

Data use on the go
According to a recent study by the Consumer Electronics Association, smartphone owners aren't really using their gadgets to talk anymore. While people spend 114 minutes each day using their devices, only 23 of those minutes are allocated to actually making calls. While this was the biggest number in terms of any single use of time, researchers actually found that combined, the time people spend on activities that require data use now far outweighs telephony-related tasks. Individuals spent an average of 18 minutes sending emails, 16 minutes looking at websites and 11 minutes checking social media.

It can be a lot of fun to use websites such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn to keep up with the people in your life, and it's clear many consumers are now utilizing their smartphones to do it. But are there any risks involved? Fast Company reported that at least when it comes to Twitter, there have been some potentially nasty spam attacks going around. Reportedly, users are being added to numerous lists as part of malware-spreading schemes. The idea is that when someone sees they've been added to a new list, they'll go look at the cybercriminal​'s Twitter account, which will be filled with malicious links. This could result in a number of terrible damages once hackers have access to their victims' personal information, including identity theft.

But what is it that's motivating people to click unfamiliar links on social media? Mashable pointed out that many of the lists spammers are putting together are related to celebrity events or the potential to get free stuff. The source reported that some cybercriminals have enticed people with promises of access to the phone numbers of Lady Gaga and One Direction's Louis Tomlinson, the potential to win a free iPhone and more.

If the idea of chatting on the phone with a boy band member gets you a bit weak in the knees, who could blame you? (Maybe you're holding out for Harry, though). Social media is a great tool, but one rash click could lead to your sensitive information falling into the wrong hands. By getting a plan from ProtectCELL that includes identity theft protection, you can get security that goes far beyond what your current mobile phone insurance currently offers. The more you use your devices, the great the risk of disaster becomes, but fortunately, you don't have to resign yourself to facing the dangers alone.

Add to Twitter Add to Facebook Add to LinkedIn Add to Digg Add to StumbleUpon Add to Delicious

Related Articles

How to protect your identity while shopping online

How to protect your identity while shopping online

5/12/2014

The world of e-commerce has made shopping more convenient than ever before.

Read More
4 tips to keep your kids safe online

4 tips to keep your kids safe online

4/16/2014

When kids begin using the Internet, it's easy for their curiosity to run wild.

Read More
The state of identity theft in the U.S.

The state of identity theft in the US

4/15/2014

Debt collection problems and bank disputes can be aggravating, but these issues do not seem to frustrate as many Americans as identity theft, a recent Federal Trade Commission study suggests.

Read More
What does mobile security mean to you?

What does mobile security mean to you?

4/8/2014

In the modern world, smartphones and tablets have practically become extensions of users themselves.

Read More