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Christmas app download data reflects smartphone user maturity

Christmas app download data reflects smartphone user maturity

1/17/2014

Over the course of 2013, the relevance of mobile devices to the daily lives of consumers only increased. Smartphones now make up the majority of the handheld phone market in the United States, and while sales of laptop computers have been on a slight but steady decline, tablets continue to take up an ever-greater portion of the consumer electronics market.

Naturally, as mobile technology has become more popular, it's also begun to play a greater role in our day-to-day lives. As such, the giddiness that we once felt about our new mobile gadgets and apps is likely to have waned somewhat over the past few years. This isn't a bad thing, however: It merely means that we're becoming more mature smartphone users.

Mixed Christmas app data sends a clear signal
Recent statistics regarding app downloads on Christmas Day 2013 reflect this transition. There's no denying that an overwhelming number of mobile apps were downloaded on Dec. 25 - but the data suggests that as consumers own smartphones and tablets for longer periods of time, the excitement initially associated with these devices is slowly but surely being replaced by reliance on the resources the gadgets provide.

According to mobile app analytics firm Flurry, this Christmas saw the greatest number of application downloads on record, with a 91 percent increase in comparison with the daily average during the first three weeks of December. Sizeable as the jump may be, however, that figure has been steadily decreasing each year between 2011 and 2013. While there was a 90 percent year-over-year growth in Christmas Day app downloads between 2011 and 2012, only 11 percent more apps were downloaded on Dec. 25, 2013, than on that day the year before.

"This marks a change from just a few years ago when smartphones and tablets represented exciting new additions to our lives that we couldn't wait to unwrap, activate and start filling up with apps," Flurry wrote. "Devices are evolving from being our new shiny toys to our everyday companions."

VentureBeat noted that the habits of long-time smartphone users aren't the same as they were when the devices were first released.

"Consumers who are on second, third or fourth devices have apps that they like and trust. They will still download new apps, but not as many as they would if they had a device for the very first time," the source wrote.

As you continue to rely more and more on your device, consider supplementing your Android or iPhone insurance with the data backup and phone buyback offered by ProtectCELL's smartphone protection plans.

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